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HUM 150 Human Services Theory, Skills, and Resources (3 credits)

This course introduces students to career fields in Human Services and other helping professions. It also teaches the beginning interpersonal skills and techniques essential for effective human services workers. Theories covered include human development, and the effects of family, culture, social systems and diversity on the development of the individual. Students will learn how to apply this knowledge when working with people, and be introduced to the range of community resources for human services. Students will also explore career goals, clarify their personal and professional values, select a Human Services option and begin the process of identifying a field internship placement for HUM 164: Field Instruction. Prerequisite: English and reading placement must be at college level proficiency.

HUM 162 Introduction to Social Work Practice (3 credits)

The student is introduced to generic social work methods; aspects of practice; the concepts of generalist; social systems interventions; and comprehensive social work service to individuals, small groups, and the community. Prerequisite: HUM 150 or permission of instructor.

HUM 164 Human Services Field Instruction and Seminar I (3 credits)

This course is the required supervised practice experience enabling the student to develop competency for the delivery of Social Work, Counseling, or Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling services at the Associate Degree level. The introductory learning experience allows the student to begin to develop a generalist knowledge base of Human Services, Social Work, Counseling, or Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling practice. Students will complete a 100-hour field placement at a site approved by the department. A medical examination, tuberculin test, background check and/or fingerprint review may be required. Prerequisites: 2.0 overall G.P.A., HUM 150, and one of the following theory courses: HUM 162, HUM 260, or ASA 268, or permission of instructor.

HUM 165 Introduction to Counseling (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to three broad areas of counseling: historical and professional foundations of the counseling profession, counseling theories, and counseling specialties (focusing on specific populations with whom counselors work or professional practices in which they are engaged). It is designed to provide an understanding of the counseling profession, an overview of the developments of counseling, fundamental counseling theories, and the variety of counseling specialty areas of practice. It is recommended that students take PSY 103 General Psychology before taking this course.

HUM 203 Child Welfare and Social Work (3 credits)

This course presents the student with an overview of the child welfare system, particularly as it pertains to working with children and families within the discipline of social work and the community-at-large. Utilizing a strengths-based empowerment perspective in child welfare, the course will provide basic knowledge and understanding of the historical and ongoing development of the child welfare system, explore current services offered in child welfare agencies and examine practice decisions based on several social work methodologies. The impact of culture norms and the social marginalization of populations will be discussed as they relate to the definitions of abuse and the welfare of children and families. Prerequisite: HUM 150 or permission of instructor.

HUM 205 Psychosocial Impact of HIV/AIDS (3 credits)

This course provides a forum for students to learn about the history and social environment of HIV/AIDS, patterns of infection and psychosocial issues such as stigma, isolation, trauma, grief and poverty. Students will also explore the role of politics, public health, and community action, and the student's responsibility to family, friends, and the community, both personally and as a professional in the helping professions.

HUM 230 Human Services With Diverse Populations (3 credits)

This course engages the students in an examination of diversity in domestic and global contexts. Primarily, we will explore the impact of ethnicity, race, gender, ability/disability, socio-economic class, and sexual orientation on our lives. Students will develop self-awareness regarding their own feelings, assumptions, and behaviors in relation to others different from themselves and how these impact their personal values and belief systems.

HUM 257 Crisis Intervention Counseling (3 credits)

This course is intended as an introduction to crisis intervention theories, models, and specific interventional therapeutic techniques. The course focuses on intervention, theories, and concepts in situational and developmental crises and is designed to assist students to acquire basic helping skills in crisis intervention counseling. Prerequisite: HUM 162, HUM 165, HUM 260, or ASA 268, or permission of instructor; PSY 103 is recommended.

HUM 260 Social Work Interviewing and Counseling (3 credits)

This course addresses the functions, roles, and techniques essential for effective social work/ human services work. It encompasses social work values, knowledge and skills in the interviewing and the counseling relationship. Prerequisite: HUM 150 or permission of instructor.

HUM 261 Social Work Policy (3 credits)

This course examines the history of social welfare and institutionalized social services and the impact on social workers and other helping professionals. Topics include: child welfare, public health, racism, sexism and the evolution of social work as a profession. Prerequisite: HUM 150 or permission of instructor.

HUM 263 Human Services Field Instruction and Seminar II (3 credits)

This course is an optional second-level field internship. The in-depth learning experience builds on the competencies of the first level and allows students to further develop their knowledge base of Human Services, Social Work, Counseling, or Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling practice. Students will complete a 100-hour field placement at a site approved by the department. A medical exam, tuberculin test, background check and/or fingerprint review may be required. Prerequisite: HUM 164 or permission of instructor.

HUM 265 Aging and the Family (3 credits)

This course is an introduction and overview of the process of aging, including interactions among the biological, psychological, social, and economic aspects of aging in our society. Areas such as nutrition, health, housing, employment, and retirement will be explored with an emphasis on the interdependence of all these areas. The present status of the elderly and possible changes that might prevent or remedy the problems they face in today's society will be discussed. Prerequisite: HUM 150 or permission of instructor.

HUM 267 Families in Crisis: Human Services Intervention (3 credits)

This course will introduce a study of families in crisis using intervention dynamics as the major treatment methodology. Focus is on specific developments and situational crises, which interfere with family functioning and coping abilities. The course will discuss social services, institutional services, and the role of the crisis counselor.

HUM 269 Social Work and People With Disabilities (3 credits)

This course will include a brief history of disabilities in our society, with definitions and discussion of various disability groupings, providers, services and interventions as well as many of the current issues that individuals with impairments and disabilities face today. It considers the impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1900 (ADA) and its effect on public awareness and attitudes. Prerequisite: HUM 150 or permission of instructor.

HUM 270 Assertiveness Training (1 credits)

This course helps students develop assertive skills for use in personal, professional, and social settings. Students will learn how to express their needs, address conflict, and assert their rights through clear, honest, and respectful interactions with others. Prerequisite: English and reading placement must be at college level proficiency.

EDU 158 Infant/Toddler Development and Care (3 credits)

This course examines all domains of infant and toddler development (newborn to age 3), including: language, cognitive, physical and social/emotional development. Atypical development and the importance of early intervention are also presented. In addition, observation and teaching strategies necessary for quality education and care of infants and toddlers will be studied. Topics include observation and assessment, developmentally appropriate curriculum, safe and healthy environments, and developing culturally responsive relationships with families. Students will be required to complete a 25-hour field placement. Prerequisite: English and reading placement at the college level.

EDU 172 Classroom Management (3 credits)

This course explores guidance theories, applications, goals, techniques, and factors that influence expectations and classroom management issues. The effects of culture and student diversity on the classroom environment will be explored. Classrooms serving children ages two to twelve years will be addressed.

EDU 180 Early Childhood Education: An Introduction (3 credits)

This course is designed to introduce prospective early childhood (Birth-2) and childhood (1-6) education teachers to the historical, philosophical and cultural approaches to the study of early childhood education. Students will examine current issues and challenges and begin development of their professional education skills and beliefs. A field component will be required. Prerequisite: English and reading placement at college level.

EDU 182 Child Growth and Development (3 credits)

This is a specialized course in child development which studies the emotional, social, cognitive and physical development from the prenatal period to pre-adolescence. Students will use observation and assessment techniques to build an understanding of growth and development. Multiple influences on child development and learning, including the sociocultural context of development, will be explored. Prerequisite: English and reading placement must be at college level.

EDU 183 Observation and Assessment of Young Children (3 credits)

This course prepares students to use systematic observations, documentation, and other assessment techniques to understand young children's growth and development. Observation and assessment will focus on physical, cognitive, language, and social/emotional development. Students will compile various observations and assessments in a study of one child's development over the course of the semester. An additional component of the course will focus on observation and assessment of early childhood education environments. Prerequisites: EDU 180 and 182, or EDU 180 and PSY 204.

EDU 184 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar I (3 credits)

The first level fieldwork course offers students the opportunity to apply theories learned in previous early childhood education courses to practice. Under the supervision of an experienced early childhood teacher, students develop basic interaction, guidance, and supervision skills. The course also focuses on implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate experiences for children. The one-hour weekly seminar is used to discuss fieldwork experiences and teaching concepts and skills. The required 100 hour field placement must be completed at the Children's Learning Center on campus, an NAEYC accredited program, or other program approved by the instructor. A medical exam, fingerprinting, and Child Abuse Central Register clearance are required. Prerequisite: EDU 182 or permission of instructor; co-requisite: EDU 281.

EDU 185 Teacher and Parent Relationships (1 credits)

This course focuses on the dynamics of child-teacher-parent relationships. Students will explore family diversity, parenting styles, effective communication, parent education, and family involvement. Strategies dealing with issues that emerge when working with young children and their families will be studied.

EDU 230 Human Services With Diverse Populations (3 credits)

This course engages the students in an examination of diversity in domestic and global contexts. Primarily, we will explore the impact of ethnicity, race, gender, ability/disability, socio-economic class, and sexual orientation on our lives. Students will develop self-awareness regarding their own feelings, assumptions, and behaviors in relation to others different from themselves and how these impact their personal values and belief systems.

EDU 275 Cultural Foundations of Education (3 credits)

This course focuses on philosophical, historical, and cultural approach to the study of education in the United States. Current educational concerns that affect teaching and schools will be studied. A social justice perspective will be emphasized. Students will complete a 30-hour field observation during this semester. Prerequisite: PSY 204 or PSY 207 or EDU 182.

EDU 280 Language and Literacy Development in Young Children (3 credits)

This course examines the development of language and literacy in young children from birth through the primary years. Students will explore theoretical foundations of early literacy development and the implementation of various models to effectively support young children as readers and writers. Other topics include: working with families to support early literacy development, selecting quality children's literature, assessing early literacy development, integrating literacy throughout the curriculum and adaptations for individual children in diverse and inclusive settings. Prerequisite: EDU 182 or EDU 158 or PSY 204 or PSY 207, or permission of instructor.

EDU 281 Curriculum Development (3 credits)

The theoretical basis for setting educational goals and planning developmentally appropriate experiences for children from birth to age eight (with emphasis on the preschool years) in group settings is studied, along with methods of planning, supervising, and evaluating experiences and activities. A field component is required in conjunction with EDU 184. Prerequisites: EDU 180 and 182, or permission of instructor; co-requisite: EDU 184 or permission of instructor.

EDU 282 Family, School and Community (3 credits)

This course examines the contexts in which children develop, including family, school, and community, and how teachers can work together with parents and community resources to foster the optimum development of children. Prerequisites: EDU 182 and PSY 103 or SOC 103 or permission of instructor.

EDU 283 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar II (3 credits)

This second level fieldwork course builds on the competencies developed in EDU 184, the first level fieldwork experience course. Particular attention is given to assuming the role and responsibilities of classroom teacher in planning, supervising and evaluating curriculum experiences that are developmentally appropriate as well as integrated. The weekly seminar is used to discuss fieldwork experiences, teaching concepts and skills. A medical exam, fingerprinting and NYS Child Abuse Central Register clearance are required. Prerequisite: EDU 184 or permission of instructor.

EDU 285 Early Childhood Special Education: An Introduction (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to special education in early childhood and the early primary grades. The legal foundation of special education, public laws, the New York State Special Education process and contemporary models and issues in the field of special education will be examined. Students will explore the causes, characteristics and educational implications of disabilities. The course will also focus on selecting/modifying appropriate teaching strategies in inclusive early childhood environments and in early primary classrooms. Strategies for working effectively with families and early childhood special education professionals in the context of early childhood programs will also be examined. Exploration of personal competencies and ethical issues in special education will be explored. A field component is required. Prerequisite: EDU 182, PSY 204 or permission of instructor.